Convergence Basics

Convergence means coming together. Fixed guns on combat aircraft are aimed
slightly inwards, so that the bullets meet at a point in front of the aircraft. This is to
concentrate as much firepower as possible in the smallest space on the enemy
aircraft. In WarBirds, the convergence range is set in the Tower screen, or by the
.conv XXX command.
















Some Practical Examples          

In the example below, an aircraft with wing-mounted guns has its convergence set to
600 yards. It is firing at an aircraft that is 300 yards away. The two banks of guns
are hitting different places on the enemy aircraft. This is not the best way of doing it.
In this example, his convergence is set too high for this attack.








In the next example (below), the pilot has got it right. This aircraft with wing-mounted
guns has its convergence set to 300 yards. The aircraft that it is firing at, is only 300
yards away. The two banks of guns are hitting the same place on the enemy
aircraft. This is the best way of doing it. He is packing a good punch on the enemy,
and can expect maximum effect.








This is probably the worst scenario. In the example below, an aircraft with
wing-mounted guns has its convergence set to 300 yards. It is firing at an aircraft
that is 600 yards away. The two banks of guns are hitting wildly different places on
the enemy aircraft. If the enemy was any further away, the two streams of fire,
might actually pass either side of the enemy without touching. If you have to fire at
distances of double (or more) of your set convergence, try to aim slightly to one side
of the enemy. That way, one bank of guns might hit the enemy aircraft.









The last example shows how little effect convergence has on an aircraft with
nose-mounted guns. This aircraft has its convergence set to 300 yards. It is firing at
an aircraft that is 600 yards away and still manages to achieve a fairly concentrated
stream of fire on the enemy aircraft.